Kerry Fleckenstein, Therapeutic Lifestyle Recovery Coach
9:00 am

You Should Be Walking

walking path - SW_ColbySchenck
Emotional Balance and Clarity
You know how some days everything just seem out of whack?  The easiest fix for that is walking. Reset your focus and I walk away the gloom. 

Good for Thinking
On a walk, you can relax your mind and let it wander, and just take in the and scenery. I've done my best work when out walking (or jogging). Something or someone will spark a new thought.

Recovery
I've always been a runner.  However recently a few days myy body just said no, so I went for a walk instead. What happened next was amazing: I worked up a sweat without killing my joints! I felt rejuvenated, inspired, and I had a sense of accomplishment. Even better: I burned the same amount of calories in my 40 minutes of walking that I would have in 25 minutes of running. 

Stress Relief
A walk provides almost instantaneous stress relief. Numerous studies show that it can lower levels of stress hormones. But I know from personal experience that—when I am feeling crazed and overwhelmed—I need a walk. Immediately, I begin to feel better physically, mentally, and spiritually.  These stress hormones can cause weight gain, memory loss, and high blood pressure.  Suffering from auto-immune symptoms?   WALK.....

Better Perspective
When I started walking around my neighborhood, I looked at the nature, people, and surroundings in a different way. I live in Santa Monica, California, which is a pretty busy city. It's easy to rush around in your car and miss your surroundings. Once I began walking, I discovered beautiful gardens and houses that I had never noticed.   I've recently moved to a new part of town.  I walk at night very often.  It's amazing the new perspective I have.  I walk past the beach, down the sidewalk, into town.  Can't help but feel great.

A New Kind Of Toning
After walking for a few months, I became aware that I was targeting and building muscles that my other routines neglected. Walking uses different muscle groups even then running muscles.  Another reason to switch it up.

It's Just Fun!
Last and definitely not least,walking is fun! Movement is a gift: I always look forward to a walk. I never see it as something I have to do—I want to do it.


Kerry Fleckenstein, Therapeutic Lifestyle Recovery Coach
12:50 pm

What? You have auto-immune disease?

CategoryThumb-LeafyGreens

So.. I am asked every week for more info on how to treat auto-immune disease and its symptoms.  Here is a bit of information that I always recommend.

I urge everyone with Hashimotos or auto-immune thyroid disease (or any auto-immune disease for that matter) to get off gluten and dairy.  At least at first using an elimination diet.  Getting off gluten has been shown sometimes to single-handedly correct auto-immune disorders and about half of people with gluten intolerance also have dairy intolerance. 

It’s important to discuss your condition with your doctor and follow instructions appropriately in case you have been prescribed medication.  Several micro-nutrients and vitamins are important for proper thyroid function, too, so you may also be able to address Hashimotos naturally. My protocol in treating low thyroid usually involves: vitamin D, as deficiency in this vitamin is more common in people with autoimmune thyroditis; iodine, which is important for normal metabolic and thyroid function; a good moderated Paleo approach to food which contain copper,  thyroid is sensitive to this element (meats, poultry and eggs are rich sources of copper); as well as zinc, selenium, vitamin A and iron, which are all important for proper thyroid function.  These can be found in a good multivitamin with Iron.  I use the Metagenics Phyto-multi with Iron.  Lets not forget pro-biotics as well as a good Omega 3.  Again as a metagenics provider I love their products. 

So let’s not forget how your auto-immune disease got turned on in the first place.  Keep in mind that stress is a significant cause of thyroid burnout. Are you under chronic stress and maybe don’t even know it?  Or you do know it but haven't found a way to cope or get it under control?  Beating Hashimotos and any other auto-immune disease,  and restoring thyroid balance will probably require some adjustments in the lifestyle department.  I say probably, but I mean definitely.  Not huge changes, but changes that can mean a world of differences.  Let’s give it a try.


Kerry Fleckenstein, Therapeutic Lifestyle Recovery Coach
9:00 am

The "Slow Down" Diet!

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Many people have a problem with their relationship with food. Some overeat, others undereat, and many struggle with their weight despite doing everything right "on paper."

How many people do you know who diet and exercise yet don't lose weight? Why is that? Oftentimes there are secondary complaints that can offer clues.

Marc David, from the Institute for the Psychology of Eating says, "Maybe they have digestive issues. Maybe they have mood, irritability, or fatigue. Maybe they have dry skin and dry hair. Then I look at their diet and find that they're eating extremely low-fat.

Now, why are they eating extremely low-fat? They're [doing it] because they have what I call the 'toxic nutritional belief' that 'fat in food equals fat on my body.' That's a piece of nutritional information that they're practicing, using, and abiding by."

The problem with believing and following this myth is that lack of dietary fat may actually be part of why you can't lose weight. One of the signs of essential fatty acid deficiency is weight gain or inability to lose weight.  We also call this Metabolic Syndrome.

This seems counter intuitive to many but research proves if you're not losing weight even though you've cut out nearly all fat, then perhaps it's time to reassess your belief system.

More often than not, adding healthy fats back into your diet will result in more regular bowel movements, an increased sense of well-being, improved appetite control, and, eventually, weight loss.

Another very big problem today is everyone is always in a rush.  Most people eat too fast, and this too cuts you off from your body's innate intelligence, so slowing down the pace at which you eat is a very important part of reestablishing this natural connection.

If you're a fast eater, you're not paying attention to the food you're eating, and you're missing what scientists call the cephalic phase digestive response (CPDR).

Cephalic phase digestive response is a fancy term for taste, pleasure, aroma, and satisfaction, including the visual stimulus of your meal.  You have probably heard that the brain takes 20 minutes or more to catch up with the stomach!

Another reason to slow down?  STRESS hinders weight loss.  When you put your body in a stress state, you have sympathetic nervous system dominance, increased insulin, increased cortisol, and increased stress hormones.

Not only will this deregulate your appetite, you're also going to eat more, because when your brain doesn't have enough time to sense the taste, aroma, and pleasure from the food, it keeps signaling that hunger has not been satisfied.

So….turn eating into a meditative act; to slow down, and become aware — of your food, and of how your body responds to the food.  We will call this the “slow down diet.”


Kerry Fleckenstein, Therapeutic Lifestyle Recovery Coach
9:00 am

“Beware the barrenness of a busy life.” ~Socrates

meditation-198986
A lesson that took me a long time to learn.  Life is less stressful when you embrace slowness.  Is your internet slow?  Good.  Is traffic slowing you down?  Perfect time to think and listen to music.

1. Double the time you think it will take to complete a task.

How often do you clock in at or under the time you’ve allotted for a task? Most don’t.  Usually we underestimate the time it will take to do something.  Every time I used to assess a  task, I would estimate it will take 20 minutes at most. Often with distractions it would take twice as long.  So you have two options.  Do half the task now, half at another time, or….  Allow more time to go slow.

2. Make a conscious effort to perform tasks slower

I’ve always been a good multi-tasker.  Or so I thought.  Dad used to say though that I could be careless.  Finally figured out it was because I was trying to get things done and get to the finish line rather that getting something done slower without any mistake.  That costs you time in the end anyway.  Whatever you’re doing at the moment, slow it down by 25 percent, whether it’s thinking, typing on a keyboard, surfing the Internet, completing an errand, or cleaning the house.

Korean Zen master Seung Sahn liked to tell his students, “When reading, only read. When eating, only eat. When thinking, only think.” To us, this means, no multitasking! I’ve discovered that it’s hard to break the multitasking habit; sometimes it feels like an addiction.

3. Stimulate your parasympathetic nervous system.

The autonomic nervous system—sometimes called the involuntary nervous system—regulates many bodily systems without our conscious direction (e.g. the circulatory and respiratory systems).

When the sympathetic nervous system is aroused, it puts us on high alert, sometimes called the “fight-or-flight” response. The sympathetic nervous system is necessary to our survival because it enables us to respond quickly when there’s a threat. When the parasympathetic nervous system is aroused, it produces a feeling of relaxation and calm in the mind and the body.

The two systems work together: as one becomes more active the other becomes less active. But they can get out of balance. Many people live in a constant state of high alert—or sympathetic nervous system arousal—even though there’s no immediate threat.

Three of the recognized causes for this are our fast-paced, never-enough-time-to-do-everything culture; sensory overload.  This is exacerbate by….you guessed it…. Multi-tasking.

What to do

Be Mindful and practice Gratefulness.

Practice calmly resting your attention on whatever is happening in the present moment. If your sympathetic nervous system is in a constant state of arousal, mindfulness helps restore the proper balance between the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems by increasing the activity of the latter. This creates a feeling of calm and relaxation.

Tis the season to be thankful.  It can also keep you healthy!





Kerry Fleckenstein, Therapeutic Lifestyle Recovery Coach
9:00 am

“Beware the barrenness of a busy life.” ~Socrates

meditation-198986
A lesson that took me a long time to learn.  Life is less stressful when you embrace slowness.  Is your internet slow?  Good.  Is traffic slowing you down?  Perfect time to think and listen to music.

1. Double the time you think it will take to complete a task.

How often do you clock in at or under the time you’ve allotted for a task? Most don’t.  Usually we underestimate the time it will take to do something.  Every time I used to assess a  task, I would estimate it will take 20 minutes at most. Often with distractions it would take twice as long.  So you have two options.  Do half the task now, half at another time, or….  Allow more time to go slow.

2. Make a conscious effort to perform tasks slower

I’ve always been a good multi-tasker.  Or so I thought.  Dad used to say though that I could be careless.  Finally figured out it was because I was trying to get things done and get to the finish line rather that getting something done slower without any mistake.  That costs you time in the end anyway.  Whatever you’re doing at the moment, slow it down by 25 percent, whether it’s thinking, typing on a keyboard, surfing the Internet, completing an errand, or cleaning the house.

Korean Zen master Seung Sahn liked to tell his students, “When reading, only read. When eating, only eat. When thinking, only think.” To us, this means, no multitasking! I’ve discovered that it’s hard to break the multitasking habit; sometimes it feels like an addiction.

3. Stimulate your parasympathetic nervous system.

The autonomic nervous system—sometimes called the involuntary nervous system—regulates many bodily systems without our conscious direction (e.g. the circulatory and respiratory systems).

When the sympathetic nervous system is aroused, it puts us on high alert, sometimes called the “fight-or-flight” response. The sympathetic nervous system is necessary to our survival because it enables us to respond quickly when there’s a threat. When the parasympathetic nervous system is aroused, it produces a feeling of relaxation and calm in the mind and the body.

The two systems work together: as one becomes more active the other becomes less active. But they can get out of balance. Many people live in a constant state of high alert—or sympathetic nervous system arousal—even though there’s no immediate threat.

Three of the recognized causes for this are our fast-paced, never-enough-time-to-do-everything culture; sensory overload.  This is exacerbate by….you guessed it…. Multi-tasking.

What to do

Be Mindful and practice Gratefulness.

Practice calmly resting your attention on whatever is happening in the present moment. If your sympathetic nervous system is in a constant state of arousal, mindfulness helps restore the proper balance between the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems by increasing the activity of the latter. This creates a feeling of calm and relaxation.

Tis the season to be thankful.  It can also keep you healthy!